Alltogether

AAC, AT, Families, Inclusion, Literacy, UDL

50 Web 2.0 Tools to Tell a Story

by Samuel Sennott

alan levine blog ss

I think that I am going to send Alan Levine some sort of thank you gift. Maybe we should start a pool. Seriously, his wikispaces site highlighting 50 Web 2.0 Tools to Tell a Story is just terrific. This is a great way to share the multitude of tools available to that excited teacher. It is a place to simply let undergraduate students in teacher training in various courses explore. As I delve ever increasingly into the read/write web, I realize that it just goes on and on. There are some great literacy tools to explore on this list that who would have imagined in 1987? 1997? Yes, 2007 I expect it, but am still so wowed by the possibilities for our learners to express themselves and to explore what they are passionate about.

So share this list. We can work on baking Alan Levine a cake or something and let us see how these tools will be practically implemented with our learners. I leave you with this thought. In some ways, a list like this is dangerous. So many directions, options, and opportunities. What tool will we use, how long does it take to use it fluently, etc.? I say live dangerously and jump in, but jump in with the tool of the SETT framework and stay focused on good teaching and learning. Again, thanks goes out to authors like this, sharing resources we are all thinking and talking about.  The URL is: http://cogdogroo.wikispaces.com/StoryTools

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November 8, 2007 - Posted by | AAC, Access, Accessibility, Assistive Technology, AT, ebooks, GoogleDocs, Literacy, writing

2 Comments »

  1. Hello Charles. Thanks for this great post. I think it is impossible to overstate either the value or the potential of digital storytelling. Alan Levine’s wiki deserves to be known far and wide. — Paul

    Comment by Paul Hamilton | November 9, 2007 | Reply

  2. It really does seem like picture tools and voice threads seem to be the way of the future in regards to 2.0 tools for students. I personally liked the links for ‘make your own timeline’ resources. What a great idea and a good way to visually show students historical information or explain to them the passing of time or the order of events, concepts, and stories.

    Comment by Kathleen G., EnableMart | November 9, 2007 | Reply


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